Help Your Child

Find a Role Model
Explore Career Options
Engage in Extracurricular Activities 
Focus on Math and Science

You Can Help Your Child Prepare for Their Future Career
Boy with laptopParents, it doesn’t matter how much education you have—you can influence your child in a positive way. There are simple things you can do today that will make it easier for your child to have a fun and rewarding career in the future. This links below will offer information to guide you on how to communicate better with teachers and school administrators to become more involved in your child’s education. It will also show you some steps you can take to prepare your kids for college and a career.

Find a Role Model
It has been proven that teenagers who have positive mentors and role models perform better in school and in college than those who do not. A mentor or role model can be anyone with an inspirational story to share or who can have a positive influence on your teen. Mentors are able to provide insight from their own experiences. Finding a role model or mentor in the career field that your child is interested in can be a tremendous benefit to helping your child reach their career goal. Your child could have the opportunity to talk to someone who is in the field and see if this is a career they would like to pursue. Below is a list of ideas for how to find mentors and role models:

  • First, sit down with your child and ask them what they want in a mentor. Do they want someone who can help them learn a new skill? What kinds of things would they like to learn about the career they are interested in?
  • Ask people you know and trust to talk with your son or daughter and share advice.
  • Invite other parents you know who can visit your home and share their work experiences and advice about college.
  • Call youth organizations in the community who have mentor programs and ask about their opportunities.
  • Ask your child’s teacher to take some extra time after-school to talk about how to prepare for college.
  • Ask the counselor at your child’s high school to give you a list of phone numbers for organizations or people who have similar interests as your teen. Call them to find out if they have mentor programs for young people.
  • Call your local college or university admissions office or careers center to find out if they have volunteers who can mentor your teenager.

Once you have identified mentors or role models, first get to know these people yourself before trusting them with your child.

Explore Career Options
It is important for your child to explore different career options that they think they may be interested in—whether it is a health career or any other career. High school is a great time for students to do job shadowing with a professional in that career field. . Many high schools have job shadow days, so be sure to ask the teacher or counselor about those types of events.

Volunteering is another great way for young people to get some experience in a work environment to help them decide on their career goals. Many hospitals have volunteer programs for high school students, but if not, don’t hesitate to call the hospital and ask about options to set up an opportunity for your child.


Engage in Extracurricular Activities
Extracurricular activities are important for you child to get involved with while they are in high school. For example, they can be a part of the band, the football team, the drama club, National Honor Society, etc. Activities like these add to the well roundedness of your child by helping them further develop their communication, team work, leadership, and time management skills.

When your child begins to fill out college applications, the application will ask about their grades as well as what kind of extracurricular activities they have participated in. College admissions programs are looking for students who can manage their time and still make the grades. Extracurricular activities at school and in the community are very beneficial for preparing your child for college and for work.

Focus on Math and Science

Many health careers use advanced skills in math and science. It is important for your child to start—even as early as middle school—taking as many math and science classes as possible to prepare them for the health career of their choice. If your child thinks that he or she wants to be a health care professional but may be nervous about math or science, encourage them that learning something new can be hard at first, but with practice, it gets easier and can be worth the effort. It is important to note that science and math are not just subjects that boys are good at, but girls can excel just as much in these subjects. Encourage your child to push themselves to be able to understand and apply the math and science skills that they are learning.


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